20 September 2016

"Do Everything You Can To Bring Mashiach"

17 Elul 5776

That's like saying "Do everything you can to bring Shabbat." We don't spend the week figuring out how to bring Shabbat. It's coming and there's nothing you can do to stop it or make it come one day earlier.

What you can do is get ready for it. You can build the anticipation for it by buying or preparing something "likvod Shabbat kodesh" each and every day leading up to it. But, of course, the big push is on, beginning on the afternoon of Yom HaShishi (Friday), because the sun is already on the downward slide and when it goes, so goes any chance of doing anything else before Shabbat enters. Once the sun sets (or you light candles), whatever condition you are in at that time, whatever preparations you have made up til then, will just have to suffice because Shabbat has arrived.

It's the same way with redemption. Redemption-in-its-Time comes no matter what we do. All we can hope for is to be ready for it when it does.

CLARIFICATION ADDED:

Because of some questions int he comments, I ahve attempted to clarify a bit the remarks above. I hope this helps.

...I only meant by this post to point out that we don't "bring" Mashiach, HKB"H sends him. If we are deserving, he comes early, if we are not, still he will come, but at the end; however, even in that case, it comes earlier than the absolute end. And just like Shabbat comes at the end of the week without regard to what we do during the week, so the geulah is guaranteed to come no matter what and no one can stop it.

However, Mashiach is the conduit for the geulah, not us. We can't get tired of waiting for it to come and think we must then go out and make it happen, because this is exactly what led to the building of the golden calf. And there are many very questionable activities being carried out by Jews today in the mistaken idea that WE have to BRING the redemption. And it is distracting many good Jews from being busy doing the very thing that can actually hasten it in its time: Torah, mitzvot, and gemilut chasadim!

Maybe some think I am nitpicking the language here, but I don't think so. I think this is a very important point and distinction.